BUSINESSEDUCATIONENTREPRENEURSSTARTUPSTECHNOLOGY

HOW TO PLAN A SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING CAMPAIGN PART TWO

HOW TO PLAN A SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING CAMPAIGN PART TWO

Step 4: Get social media inspiration from industry leaders, competitors, clients

If you are sure what kind of content and information will get you the most engagement? For inspiration, look to what others in your industry are sharing and use social media listening to see how you can distinguish yourself from competitors and appeal to prospects they might be missing.

Consumers can also offer social media inspiration, not only through the content that they share but in the way that they phrase their messages. See how your target audience writes Tweets, and strive to mimic that style. Also learn their habits—when they share and why—and use that as a basis for your social media marketing plan.

A final source of social media inspiration is industry leaders.  Companies in every industry imaginable have managed to distinguish themselves through advanced social media strategies. Follow them and learn everything you can. See if they’ve shared any social media advice or insight elsewhere on the web.

Step 5: Create a content plan and editorial calendar

Having great content to share will be essential to succeeding at social media. Your social media marketing plan should include a content marketing plan, comprised of strategies for content creation and content curation, as well as an editorial calendar. Your content marketing plan should answer the following questions:
  • What types of content you intend to post and promote on social media
  • How often you will post content
  • Target audience for each type of content
  • Who will create the content
  • How you will promote the content
Your editorial calendar lists the dates and times you intend to publish blogs, Instagram and Facebook posts, Tweets, and other content you plan to use during your social media campaigns. 
Create the calendar and then schedule your messaging in advance rather than updating constantly throughout the day. This gives you the opportunity to work hard on the language and format of these messages rather than writing them on the fly whenever you have time. Be spontaneous with your engagement and customer service rather than your content.
Make sure your calendar reflects the mission statement you’ve assigned to each social profile. If the purpose of your LinkedIn account is to generate leads, make sure you are sharing enough lead generation content. You can establish a content matrix that defines what share of your profile is allocated to different types of posts. For example:
  • 50 percent of content will drive back to your blog
  • 25 percent of content will be curated from other sources
  • 20 percent of content will support enterprise goals (selling, lead generation, etc.)
  • five percent of content will be about HR and culture
If you’re unsure of how to allocate your resources, a safe bet is to follow the Social Media Rule of Thirds:
  • One-third of your social content promotes your business, converts readers, and generates profit
  • One-third of your social content should share ideas and stories from thought leaders in your industry or like-minded businesses
  • One-third of your social content should be personal interactions with your audience.

HOW TO PLAN A SOCIAL MEDIA MARKETING CAMPAIGN PART TWO

Step 6: Test, evaluate and adjust your social media marketing plan

To find out what adjustments need to be made to your social media marketing strategy, you should constantly be testing. Build testing capabilities into every action you take on social networks. For example, you could:
  • Track the number of clicks your links get on a particular platform using URL shorteners and UTM codes
  • Use Hootsuite’s social media analytics to track the success and reach of social campaigns
  • Track page visits driven by social media with Google Analytics
Record and analyze your successes and failures, and then adjust your social media marketing plan in response.
Surveys are also a great way to gauge success—online and offline. Ask your social media followers, email list, and website visitors how you’re doing on social media. This direct approach is often very effective. Then ask your offline customers if social media had a role in their purchasing. This insight might prove invaluable when you look for areas to improve.
The most important thing to understand about your social media marketing plan is that it should be constantly changing. As new networks emerge, you may want to add them to your plan. As you attain goals, you will need to set new targets. Unexpected challenges will arise that you need to address. As you scale your business, you might need to add new roles or grow your social presence for different branches or regions.
Rewrite your social media strategy to reflect your latest insights, and make sure your team is aware of what has been updated.
If you are interested in us planning your social media campaign, inbox us here.
Show More

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Check Also

Close
Close
%d bloggers like this: